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Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

With reference to today’s headline food News in the British
press and Media on Fat.

Don’t get carried away and think you can eat whatever you want – Oh no that is not what today’s news means, the press of course have sensationalised it. They’ve created drama where there isn’t any. Nothing has changed – it’s just that the medical profession is catching up with the science.

Nutritional therapists on the other hand are well ahead of doctors in this. We have been saying fat is good, sugar and carbs are bad, for years. There are many fats that are NOT good for you – but these are not the normal natural fats that the medical profession and manufacturers have convinced people over the last 3 decades or more to avoid.
Saturated fat is a normal requirement of the human body. It helps give us more energy and makes us more satiated (feel full) than carbohydrates. It is sugar and carbs that get turned into and stored as fat in the body. It is the carbs without fats that cause blood sugar imbalances and create problems. We NEED fat – it is vital for health.

  • Fats are concentrated source of energy.
  • Carries and transports the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.
  • Helps the body use protein and carbohydrates more efficiently.
  • A component of every cell wall.
  • Deposits of fat in the body serve to support and cushion vital organs, and to provide insulation.
  • The body’s chief storage form for energy and work.
  • Carries the compounds that give foods their aroma and flavor.
  • Cholesterol is vital for making hormones and Vitamin D (which actually is a hormone named wrongly)
  • Can determine the amount of inflammation there is in the body.

Overeating it, for example fatty fry up is NOT what is being recommended. These are damaged, toxic BAD fats – and should  only be eaten every now and againButter fro Neals Yard

These are the fats to consume:

Butter – in moderation (Goats butter has much less cholesterol)
Olive oil – try not to use old olive oil that’s been sitting around for months
Avocado and avocado oil
Nut oils, Seed Oils, nuts and seeds – but make sure not old – keep in fridge
Flax oil – High content of Omega3 – helps keep blood thin, very good for skin and contains good natural estrogens. Coconut oil/butter – Make sure cold pressed and not heated (the fat in coconut milk should be eaten only in moderation)
Rapeseed
Sesame
WalnutAvocado butter with lemon small
SunFlower
Eggs – contrary to popular belief eggs are good for you- the organic version will have higher content of good fats as the chicken’s feed and life is higher quality.
Oliy fish – in moderation (due to heavy metal content)
Meat – in moderation.
Dairy – in moderation.

If you have been fat free for a while , you may find your digestion take a while to get used to it, reduce intake if any problems. Over eating fat can put a heavy demand on the liver and digestion, and if you have had your gall bladder removed be very careful of your fat intake and consult your doctor.

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It may surprise you to know that you can warm yourself up without heating, extra clothes or a big cosy fire.

There are some magical foods that really can affect your circulation and warmth both internally and externally – AND at the same time have wonderful health benefits.

As I write I am sitting here in my cold study (I refuse to heat the whole house just for me) with a mug of piping hot water, slices of fresh ginger and a teaspoon of cinnamon. It is delicious and every mouthful I can feel warming my tummy and gradually spreading through my body.
It will take a bit longer to reach my toes, but there’s a remedy for that: powdered ginger in my socks! I tried it a while ago not realizing it is actually quite an old tradition and lots of people around the world do it. You can also put cayenne pepper in your socks and its keep feet toasty warm. The added benefit is that both are antiviral and antibacterial – so guess what – it keeps your feet clean too. Just make sure you wash it off your hands and don’t touch your eyes.

Ginger

An amazing spice, with such an unusual appearance as it is the root of the Ginger plant that is used. It is an ancient spice and has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years.

It is a ‘vasodilator’, which means it dilates blood vessels making more capacity for blood flow; hence it’s ability to improve circulation. As well as this it is a hot aromatic spice, which means it increases digestive fire, or heat in the stomach, which eventually radiates through the body, with increased circulation the heat can flow more freely.

You can use the same sliced ginger for 3 or 4 drinks; just keep filling up with hot water.
Adding ginger to any foods increases the warming effect – even a cold salad can be ‘heated’ up with a dressing made from fresh ginger, apple cider vinegar and olive oil.

Ginger has many other health benefits, which I shall post at a later date.

Cinnamon

This spice has been around and used for so many years; the Ancient Egyptians used to value it more than gold. It has been used as medicine for so long that it is even mentioned the bible. Quite rightly so, it is a wonderful spice that has a beautiful aroma and flavour and has some magical health benefits.

It stimulates metabolism so you burn more calories, which causes more heat.
It also has a warming nature and added to any foods increases the
warmth of the dish.
Add a spoonful to your porridge or cereal, put it in hot chocolate or mix it with honey and make a delicious spread for toast or crackers.
You can also put the honey
mix straight into hot water for
a warming sweet tea.

Cinnamon has a healthy influence on blood sugar and
cholesterol levels too.

 

Cloves

Another ancient spice, which has been used medicinally for 2000 years.
It has pain relief qualities along with anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties.
A warming spice too – hence why it’s used in mulled wine for the winter nights.
Drop a few cloves into an herbal tea and it will create more warmth as well as flavour.

Cayenne pepper (now we’re talking warmth)

Cayenne pepper is a fantastic warming spice, the more you can tolerate the warmer you will be, but even just a little can make you glow.
This spice can warm you up in winter and cool you down in summer.
It speeds up metabolism, which burns more calories, which as you know by know creates more heat.
It stimulates digestion – building up the furnace inside.

You can add this to anything, it is so practical.
I love sprinkling it on top of a mug of soup, adding some heat to a hot pot or stir-fry. I eat lots of raw cabbage salads even through the winter – my sesame and kale salad with butterbeans is deliciously warming with a cayenne pepper and ginger dressing.

The added extras of cayenne are its antioxidant properties, Regular consumption increases the resistance of blood lipids to oxidative damage by free radicals- which translates as ‘helps keep blood clean’.

All of the above breathe energy and heat into your circulation which is why they are so warming, they thin the blood and make it easier for nutrients to get to tissues, which is why they can help in disease and sickness too.

Other delicious ‘Heaters’ are:

Horseradish
Yellow mustard
Wasabi
Black pepper

Look out for my next post on Foods and Nutrients to Fight a cold once you’ve caught one.

Please NOTE: If you are taking blood thinning medications, please check with your health care provider before consuming large amounts of the above.

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One day in February I decided that as I am a nutritional therapist – I should have a go at growing things (to eat).

I wanted to appreciate what goes into growing some of the foods that I recommend people to have in their diet. In fact I wanted to get that satisfied feeling that I had actually managed to grow something. I am not green fingered, so if I can manage it anyone can as long as they can squeeze a bit of space from their garden or even their patio. Lily, my assistant and I go out to look at little shoots that have come up over night and are constantly amazed and delighted by them (well it’s a novelty at the moment)

I have done this with a little bit of advise from a gardening lady.  I can’t say that I have taken it too seriously – or placed it high on the agenda – which is partly why I am only really just starting now at the end of June. I did with he help from Lily, manage to plant some seedlings that my children had helped start to grow (kind of as they put the seeds in the pots that I supplied, then left them in their play house to die).

My small vegetable patch has been very hard come by, as my husband doesn’t want me to create a patch that fails to mirror the rest of the garden. I have very surreptitiously gained inch by inch of earth. I did get lucky (if you can really call it that) as our house has subsidence and the insurance company has insisted on taking out vegetation – this has allowed me to get a bit more space, but I had to wait for it as insurance companies move in a completely different time dimension to normal folk.

So for all you people out there that have never even considered growing something here’s what we are doing. I hope that this encourages you to have a go yourself. We can learn together. If any of you have any advise to give us please feel free, it would be appreciated. As yet I have not got great satisfaction as the vulnerable little seedlings look painfully fragile and I can’t quite believe they will grow into edible foods.

Getting the seeds ready

6 weeks ago we planted seeds in some seedling pots – as it was quite warm I took them from the children’s playhouse and kept them on the garden bench. They sprouted quite nicely.

WEEK ONE

Getting the earth ready – June 15th

I first started getting the earth ready with the children. We spent 3 hours just getting the small stones out. My daughter and I raked . dug and sorted whilst my son played with his strange monster toys around our feet.

My son enjoying the mud

Then we waited for the tree men to remove a few bushes that the insurance company claimed were bringing down our house (hmm). Having cleared these we raked some more. I then went to the nearest garden centre and purchased some organic compost which smells like it will produce robust organic fare.

The soil is ready for planting

I also bought: tarragon, two cherry tomato plants, mint, dill, strawberries and 3 pots to grow these in.

We had previously planted some seeds in a few starter pots: Sage, radichio, radishes, chives, thyme, rocket and beetroot.

Shoots Ready for Planting

We watered the earth and place compost on top. We then marked out lines with wooden kebab sticks and thick white thread.We then lifted the seedlings out and planted them using the space guide on the seed packs. I also put a couple of old bits of floor tiles down as stepping-stones.

We also planted some other seeds that are fine to go straight into the ground: swede, cabbage. Lettuce and broccoli, in this picture you can see a few tiny broccoli shoots about a week after sewing. You can also see we have an awful lot of stones in the earth.

I decided to keep the tomatoes in the pots, along with a selection of herbs in another pot and the strawberries in an old pot. It’s a bit of a cop out but they are safer it seems.

Tiger Helping Out

I tore a piece of the pack to put on the stick to mark what was growing and where. Of course with the help of our cat Tiger (a very loud Bengal).

Strawberries

We also planted a few beans seedlings. These are really cut and quick to grow. I have put long kebab sticks next to them and they have started o grow up them. The little feelers they put out are so delicate. When they are big enough we will take them out of the pot and put them at the back of the patch with much bigger sticks.

Beans

Tiny Broccoli shoots

Freshly Planted Seed

We were actually very pleased with our efforts and it all looked very hopeful.The next day however I went out to check on it and found that the foxes had bitten through 3 of our strings and managed to move a lot of the sticks.We have since had the fence completely renewed and I think they are unable to climb such a high fence. They do still come in the garden but so far have only chewed through two more strings. I can tell that they are still walking over it though.

We have considered getting netting – but I feel that the foxes will find that even more enticing as it is another thing for them to chew.

To day we will put lots more sticks everywhere so it is harder to walk around that area. The patch gets watered twice a day, we all take it in turns.

A rather strange thing is happening over night. Where the fox chews through the string (well I am assuming it is a fox) the string is then loose. For two mornings running I have come out to find the loose string wound up and pulled down into a small  in the ground. I have to pull it all the way out. It’s as if a small being has wound it up and then buried it. I am the first down stairs at 6am so I know it is not my children. I would love to set a camera up to capture all the animals that are contributing to the early morning state of our vegetable patch.

June 28th 2010 Monday
I have cleaned it all up and put new string onto the one that has gone missing (maybe completely buried by the underground string thief!)

So far it really hasn’t taken that much effort, it has been fitted in to what time I have at the end of the day or a snatch lunch break and a little weeding and watering at the weekend. I have asked my daughter, my assistant and any one else who is around to water it and keep an eye out for weeds.

June 30th 2010 Wednesday

Yesterday morning I went out side to find the string everywhere – the seedlings were trampled and there were holes where the foxes paws had been. The seeds are getting displaced and seedlings are getting trampled.

Last night I decided to take further action against fox activity and use sticks instead of string to keep them of the vegetable patch.

Sticks to Protect Patch from Wild Animals

It does appear to have worked although a few sticks had been removed and some trampling had occurred.

I have been a bit preoccupied with the fox destruction and have not been taking notice of the fact that the beetroot shoots are not growing any bigger. The seeds that I planted along side them are growing – so it seems that planting them straight into the ground may be better.

The radishes are doing well – although some have been trampled

Radish Shoots

June 30th 2010 Wednesday

Yesterday morning I went out side to find the string everywhere – the seedlings were trampled and there were holes where the foxes paws had been. The seeds are getting displaced and seedlings are getting trampled.

Last night I decided to take further action against fox activity and use sticks instead of string to keep them of the vegetable patch.

It does appear to have worked although a few sticks had been removed and some trampling had occurred.

I have been a bit preoccupied with the fox destruction and have not been taking notice of the fact that the beetroot shoots are not growing any bigger. The seeds that I planted along side them are growing – so it seems that planting them straight into the ground may be better.

The radishes are doing well – although some have been trampled

Other things to grow:

Lately I have been sprouting seeds with great success. I bought a’BioSnacky’ jar approx £4-£5. It is so simple to use.
I chose mung beans first and then I tried sunflower seeds.

Sprouting Mung beans

The directions are so simple – you soak the beans / seeds for approx 7-8 hours so can be night or day and then empty out the jar – fill again and rinse the empty out complete and leave to grow. Once a day you fill up with water and rinse off again. The sunflower seeds too 3 days – and they were wonderful (I think my favourite sprouted seeds)

Sunflowerseed Sprouts

I had then with cubed papaya, mustard cress – which I also grew very easily and an avocado and onion spelt tart that I created. (I will make this recipe available soon as it was really good)

Mustard cress is so easy – I found these lovely painted mental pots on a tray for around £10 that I will use over and over. I put some peat in the pots water them and sprinkled the seeds –they grew in less than a week. Give them a very small amount of water every day.
You can of course just grow cress on cotton wool or tissue – but I like to think that more nutrients are going in if you have some soil.

Watercress

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